Dry Eye

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What is DRY EYE?

Dry eye occurs when tears aren't able to provide adequate moisture. The risk of acquiring this condition increases with age. It's also seen more commonly among postmenopausal women.

The eye may become dry, red, and inflamed. The main symptoms are discomfort when blinking, changes in vision, and sensitivity to light.

The tear film is made of three layers:

  • An oily layer
  • A watery layer
  • A mucus layer

We can perform different therapies or use specific eye drops to help out each layer specifically.

The oily layer is the outside of the tear film. It makes the tear surface smooth and keeps tears from drying up too quickly. This layer is made in the eye’s meibomian glands.

The watery layer is the middle of the tear film. It makes up most of what we see as tears. This layer cleans the eye, washing away particles that do not belong in the eye. This layer comes from the lacrimal glands in the eyelids.

The mucus layer is the inner layer of the tear film. This helps spread the watery layer over the eye’s surface, keeping it moist. Without mucus, tears would not stick to the eye. Mucus is made in the conjunctiva. This is the clear tissue covering the white of your eye and inside your eyelids.

Causes of dry eye:

  • Certain diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren’s syndrome, thyroid disease, and lupus
  • Blepharitis (when eyelids are swollen or red)
  • Entropion (when eyelids turn in); ectropion (eyelids turn outward)
  • Being in smoke, wind or a very dry climate
  • Looking at a computer screen for a long time, reading and other activities that reduce blinking
  • Using contact lenses for a long time
  • Having refractive eye surgery, such as LASIK
  • Taking certain medicines, such as:
  • Diuretics (water pills) for high blood pressure
  • Beta-blockers, for heart problems or high blood pressure
  • Allergy and cold medicines (antihistamines)
  • Sleeping pills
  • Anxiety and antidepressant medicines
  • Heartburn medicines

Watch a video on dry eye below to learn more.

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